So I Compared a T-Mobile G1 vs an iPhone

I’ll continue to update this as I continue to learn about both phones, but I’ll start with some first impressions.

  • The G1 is noticeably bigger, but not bad.

    It’s bigger than the iPhone, bigger than my RAZR VR3, thinner than my wife’s old T-Mobile Wing, but way smaller than my Zaurus c860. It fits in a shirt pocket or pants pocket (though my wife is concerned about it being tight in her jeans pockets).

    It meets my size criteria, though I’d like it to be smaller – I forget the iPhone is in my pocket, not likely to forget the G1.

  • The bend of the G1 isn’t bad. I was really concerned from the pictures of the bent-up bottom of the phone, but you don’t notice it, it isn’t bad to hold either in portrait or landscape. Not a problem.
  • The iPhone screen is noticeably larger, and a bluer white. The G1 screen is brighter, and a bit warmer (more yellow) white.
  • Android needs a review of “small screen” mentality. Apple got this right (very right) in that whatever application is presenting content to the user gets the whole screen. Smaller-than-screen windows should be rare, and only for very small announcements.

    There are lots of places Android uses sub-screen windows, often presenting large amounts of content without making full use of the available screen real estate. This is present in basic functionality – like the Applications tab not using the whole screen – and applications using dialog boxes.

    You can really see this by going into the Settings|About section – all the Legal documents are presented in a centered dialog box, appearing over the background window, even though they have pages and pages of content. If you open the DMCA info, you get a web page that is scrolled horizontally half off this tiny dialog box because of navigation controls on the left side (but they’re not even visible because the page is scrolled down past them). Really obnoxious. Kudos to Apple.

    Oh, and one more example: setting up a Wireless access code. the G1 pops up a dialog box (again, smaller than screen size) for you to enter your key. And you have to open the keyboard, rotating to landscape mode, to enter it, because there is no onscreen touch keyboard. Then you type the key, and there is a half-exposed control at the bottom of the dialog box. If you scroll the dialog box up a bit, you can see that it is a checkbox to display the key as you’re typing it. If the dialog took advantage of the whole screen, you wouldn’t need to scroll to see this option.

  • Android is much less aware of its device than the iPhone is. No, I’m not trying to anthropomorphize the phones.

    When you tip the iphone, it (usually) rotates to landscape. Touch is integrated throughout the iPhone system, to go back, to select options, etc. You always interact by touching the screen.

    I haven’t found anything on the G1 that recognizes when I’m holding it landscape unless I open the keyboard. Then everything is landscape, even if I’m still holding the phone vertically. The only way to rotate the browser to landscape/wide-screen viewing is to open the keyboard.

    With Android, you go to the home screen by pushing the off-center home button. You get menus by pressing the menu button. You go back by pressing the back button. These functions are never presented on screen for a touch. I find myself constantly wondering, “How to I get back to that last window? Oh, yeah, the button”, whereas with the iPhone, it’s presented where your focus is, on the screen. I’m always forgetting what functions need the menu button, which need home, and which need back.

    Now, I realize that onscreen controls cost screen real estate (not as much as the “dialog boxes” do, though!). Maybe I’ll remember the G1 controls more naturally later, but for now, the physical buttons aren’t helping usability.

    And sometimes, things you really should be able to touch can’t be selected by touch – in the google legal information, you can’t touch-to-select a link until you’ve touched the trackball, then you can touch to select.

  • Apple’s browser is easier to use. The zoom & scroll is easier than the G1, thanks to the multitouch interface. Android could do better than its clunky buttons even without a touch screen, but for now it’s clunky.
  • To take a screenshot on an iPhone: hold down the “sleep” button and press and release the “home” button. It saves the screenshot to the Photos directory.

    To take a screenshot on the G1: connect the G1 via USB, install the SDK, run DDMS, select your handset, and press Ctrl-S, then save the image. ( *sigh*


  1. Lucie Said,

    November 4, 2008 @ 2:40 am

    I tried to follow your instructions for taking screenshots with my g1, and it is not working: when I launch DDMS (by clicking on the icon ddms.bat in the Tools folder, I do not see my device in the left pane.
    Do you think you could help me out here? I have 2 hints:
    - when I plug my g1 to the pc, the notification USB connected “select to copy files to/from your computer” appears, then a pop up window “select “Mount if you want to copy files between your computer and your phone’s SD card”. Shall I choose Mount or Don’t Mount (either way it is not working)
    - when I installed the sdk, I unzipped the folder into my Program Files folder, but did not install anything. I already have the JDK and Eclipse installed but how do I make sure it runs properly ?

    Thank you for your help.


  2. kb Said,

    November 6, 2008 @ 12:43 am


    I added a more detailed post, that includes the step about installing drivers so your Windows machine can talk to your G1 (and the link for other OSes as well).

    Hope it helps…


  3. jr Said,

    October 18, 2009 @ 9:10 am

    You don’t seem to grasp that the G1 and android in general are designed with multi-tasking in mind. The iphone doesn’t grok multi-tasking.

  4. cs 1.6 portable do pobrania Said,

    October 1, 2017 @ 12:17 pm

    counter strike 1.6 portable do pobrania…

    So I Compared a T-Mobile G1 vs an iPhone…

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